Archive for the ‘Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders’ Category

National Cancer Survivors Day® Observed Sunday, June 1

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

Noreen LaBatt National Cancer Survivors Day® (NCSD) is Sunday, June 1, 2014. This 27th annual celebration of life will be held in hundreds of communities worldwide. Cancer survivors, caregivers, family members, friends, and healthcare professionals will unite to show that life after a cancer diagnosis can be meaningful, productive, and even inspiring.

The Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Hope & Healing in collaboration with Central Maine Medical Center, St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center and the Lakes Region Oncology Nursing Society is hosting the Hollywood-themed event, featuring keynote speaker Noreen Labatt, a full-time Mom who turned her cancer experience into a life-affirming comedy act. There will be activities for cancer survivors and caregivers of all ages including reiki, self-massage, mindfulness meditation, healthy cooking demonstrations, opportunities for photographs, frame-making, music and more. Light refreshments will be served. The event takes place on Sunday, June 1st, 2014, at The Dempsey Center, 29, Lowell St., Lewiston, Maine from noon – 3pm. Reservations are requested – contact The Dempsey Center at 795-8250. This local event is part of a worldwide celebration coordinated by the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation and supported nationally by Coping® with Cancer magazine.

“Come walk the red carpet at the Hollywood inspired event and learn how surviving cancer is more than just living. It’s an attitude about life and living each day to the fullest,” says Maureen Higgins, Cancer Health Outreach Educator for The Dempsey Center. “You will find our community’s NCSD event filled with joy, camaraderie, hope, compassion, faith, and love as we honor cancer survivors for their strength and courage. Come listen to inspiring speakers, connect with others, enjoy some music and participate in a variety of wellness activities.”

Anyone living with a history of cancer – from the moment of diagnosis through the remainder of life, is a cancer survivor, according to the NCSD Foundation. Nearly 14 million Americans are now living with and beyond a diagnosis of cancer. In the United States, men have a slightly less than 1 in 2 lifetime risk of developing cancer; for women, the risk is a little more than 1 in 3. Learning about this disease is crucial, because many forms of cancer can be prevented and most cured if detected early.

Major advances in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment have resulted in longer survival, and therefore, a growing number of cancer survivors. However, a cancer diagnosis can leave a host of problems in its wake. Physical, financial, and emotional hardships often persist after diagnosis and treatment. Survivors may face many challenges, such as limited access to cancer specialists and promising new treatments, inadequate or no insurance, financial hardships, difficulty finding employment, psychosocial struggles, and a lack of understanding from family and friends. In light of these difficulties, our community needs to focus on improving the quality of life for cancer survivors.

“Despite these challenges, cancer survivors live full, productive lives and serve as an inspiration to all of us. Whether in Hollywood or in Maine, they are the true stars.” says Jen Hazen, Oncology Nurse Navigator, St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center.

This year’s local National Cancer Survivors Day celebration of life will be held in our community at
WHERE: The Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Hope & Healing, 29 Lowell St., Lewiston, Maine
WHEN: June 1, 2014, noon – 3pm.
RSVP: 795-8250
Visit NCSD.org for more information about National Cancer Survivors Day.

Hormone Therapy & Breast Cancer

Wednesday, October 10th, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
10.2.12

Is This Treatment Right for You? 

Estrogen makes certain types of breast cancers grow. By reducing the amount of the hormone or blocking its effects can reduce the risk of the cancer returning after surgery. That’s where hormone therapy comes in. Hormone therapy medicines can also be used to help shrink or slow the growth of some advanced-stage or metastatic breast cancers.

Mahesh Pandey, MD, a hematologist/oncologist at St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, will explain how hormonal therapy works, the different types of medicines used, and potential side effects caused by the drugs at a free community presentation.

The presentation will be held on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 at 5:30 pm at Lepage Large Conference Room, 99 Campus Avenue in Lewiston. Seating is limited so please call 777-8458 to reserve your seat today. Light refreshments will be served.

 

July is Bladder Cancer Awareness Month

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

Bladder cancer forms in the tissues of the bladder. Most bladder cancers begin in the cells that make up the lining of the bladder and can be a result of chronic irritation and inflammation.

You may not know it, but bladder cancer is the fifth most common form of cancer in the United States. More than 70,000 Americans were diagnosed with the disease last year, and nearly 15,000 died from it. New research shows a big problem may be that almost no one gets the recommended treatment.

People who smoke are four times as prone to bladder cancer as nonsmokers. About half of bladder cancer cases in women age 50 and are now traceable to smoking, up from 20 or 30 percent in earlier decades. This finding means that women have now caught up to men in the percentage of bladder cancers attributable to cigarettes.

New Provider Joins St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders

Monday, July 23rd, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

7/20/12

St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders is pleased to announce a new addition to its team. Gregory S. Emmons, DO will join hematologists and oncologists Mahesh Pandey, MD and Yelena Patsiornik, MD. Dr. Emmons earned his medical degree from the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine in Biddeford, Maine. He completed residency in Internal Medicine at Maine Medical Center in Portland and a dual fellowship in hematology and oncology at Baystate Medical Center, the western campus of Tufts University School of Medicine located in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Dr. Emmons, a native of Richmond, Maine, has recently returned to the area with his wife and young son. His experience and knowledge will advance the quality cancer care in the community.

To learn more about St. Mary’s center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, please visit us on the web or call (207) 777-4420.

St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders Relay for Life Team Will Be Walking In Honor of Their Cancer Patients

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

The American Cancer Society will be holding its annual Relay for Life on June 16-17. The Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders has formed a team and will be walking in honor of all their cancer patients. Relay for Life is an overnight team walking event to support local American Cancer Society programs, services, education and advocacy efforts. The event consists of teams of co-workers, families,neighbors and youth coming together for 16 hours to take turns walking the track to raise awareness and funds. At least one member of the team is on the track throughout the event. Teams set up campsites and stay for the entire program. The spirit of the Relay is truly amazing.

The event includes celebrating cancer survivors and caregivers, lots of entertainment, and fun activities throughout the night. If you or someone you know is a cancer survivor or caregiver, please invite them to attend Relay. Registration will be at the event starting at 3pm.

On June 16th, at 9:30pm we will hold our Luminaria Ceremony. This is a time for us to honor and remember those touched by cancer. Candle lanterns remembering those lost, and honoring those fighting cancer are lit in an unbroken circle around the track. Each person honored or remembered will have their names read out loud. It is a beautiful and touching ceremony.

If you have any questions about Relay for Life or would like more information on how to get involved, please contact the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345.

We Relay to create a world with more cancer survivors.

St. Mary’s Cancer Program Earns Accreditation with Commendation

Friday, June 1st, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
5/31/12

St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders has earned a Three-Year Accreditation with Commendation from the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS).

“The team at the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders always strives to provide the best care and quality outcomes for our patients,” said Karen Clark, the Vice President of St. Mary’s Physician Network who oversees the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders. “This Accreditation with Commendation is a testament to their success in providing that high level of care.”

Receiving care at a CoC-accredited cancer program ensures that a patient will have access to:

· Comprehensive care, including a range of state-of-the-art services and equipment

· A multispecialty team approach to coordinate the best treatment options

· Information about ongoing clinical trials and new treatment options

· Access to cancer-related information, education, and support

· A cancer registry that collects data on type and stage of cancers and treatment results and offers lifelong patient follow-up

· Ongoing monitoring and improvement of care

· Quality care, close to home

A facility receives a Three-Year Accreditation with Commendation following the onsite evaluation by a physician surveyor during which the facility demonstrates a Commendation level of compliance with one or more standards that represent the full scope of the cancer program (cancer committee leadership, cancer data management, clinical services, research, community outreach, and quality improvement). In addition, a facility receives a compliance rating for all other standards.

The CoC is a consortium of professional organizations dedicated to improving survival rates and quality of life for cancer patients through standard-setting, prevention, research, education and the monitoring of comprehensive, quality care.

The Accreditation Program, a component of the CoC, sets standards for cancer programs and reviews the programs to ensure they conform to those standards. Accreditation by the CoC is given only to those facilities that have voluntarily committed to providing the highest level of quality cancer care and that undergo a rigorous evaluation process and review of their performance. To maintain accreditation, facilities with CoC-accredited cancer programs must undergo an on-site review every three years.

Through an exclusive partnership with the American Cancer Society, the CoC provides information on the resources, services, and cancer treatment experience for each CoC-accredited cancer program. This information can be found on the American Cancer Society’s web site at www.cancer.org and through their Information Center at 1-800-ACS-2345.

For more about St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, please visit us on the web.

St. Mary’s Center for Cancer & Blood Disorders is Proud to be the Relay for Life Survivorship Sponsor

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Our Focus is on Living

HOPE

Up-to-date information to improve your quality of life.

CARE

First rate, accredited team including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, nutritionist, pastoral care providers, and exercise physiologists caring for people living with cancer.

SUPPORT

Informing and educating our patients on treatment and into survivorship through the help of the Oncology Nurse Navigator, Oncology Social Worker, Nutritional Consults and many other supportive programs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sun Safety Wear Hats and Glasses to Work Day at St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

 

In recognition of Skin Cancer Awareness Month, staff at St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders donned sunglasses and hats for the day.

Sun: How much is too much” presentation by Dr. Mahesh Pandey of St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders

Wednesday, May 16th, 2012

Many thanks to go out to the large crowd of participants who attended the “Sun: How much is too much” presentation by Dr. Mahesh Pandey of St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders. Community members enjoyed learning how different types of skin cancers are caused, and the preventative measures available to decrease their risk. Everyone also had the opportunity to have a free sun damage screening – the line was almost out the door!

May is skin cancer awareness month

Friday, April 27th, 2012

As summer approaches there are several reminders to protect yourself from the sun with sunscreen, shade, hats, and long sleeves. What does not get mentioned as often is indoor tanning.

Indoor tanning has become very popular among young adult women and teenage girls. Many teens and their parents think getting a tan indoors is safer than tanning in the sun. But the truth is that tanning booths, lamps, or sunbeds emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation, just as the sun does. And any exposure to UV radiation can raise your risk of skin cancer.

UV radiation also causes premature wrinkles, freckles, leathery texture, and loss of elasticity.

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States and this year alone there will be more then 2 million people diagnosed with squamous cell and basal cell cancers and 70,230 cases of melanoma.

The St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders will be promoting skin cancer awareness on May 23, by wearing hats and sunglasses to work.