Archive for the ‘St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center’ Category

Rheumatologist Joins St. Mary’s Medical Staff

Thursday, September 17th, 2015


asia mubashir hs 9-2015 croppedSt. Mary’s Rheumatology welcomes Dr. Asia Mubashir, MD. Prior to joining St. Mary’s, Dr. Mubashir started the first-of-its-kind Center for Arthritis & Rheumatism in North India, which catered to about five thousand patients within its first two years of operation. Dr. Mubashir has also served as an Assistant Professor of Rheumatology at the Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C. She earned her Rheumatology fellowship from the University of Connecticut and completed her Internal Medicine residency at Winthrop University Hospital, New York. Dr. Mubashir was also a researcher at Columbia University, New York Presbyterian Hospital. She went to medical school at UTESA in the Dominican Republic.

Dr. Mubashir is a Fellow of the American College of Rheumatology and of the American College of Physicians.  She is a member of the Arthritis Foundation and Indian Rheumatology Association.

St. Mary’s Rheumatology is dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of people with disorders of the joints, muscles, tendons, and other connective tissue. Rheumatic diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, tendinitis, lupus, scleroderma and almost 200 other types of conditions.

For more information about St. Mary’s Rheumatology or Dr. Mubashir, please visit or call (207) 777-4459.

CCS Pediatrics Welcomes Leigh Sweet, MD, MPH

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015
Leigh Sweet, MD, MPH CCS Pediatrics

Leigh Sweet, MD, MPH
CCS Pediatrics

CCS Pediatrics is proud to announce Leigh Sweet, MD, MPH, has joined their team of Pediatric providers. Dr. Sweet is Fellowship trained in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston, Texas. She performed her Chief Residency and Pediatric Residency at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center in Hartford, Connecticut. She earned her medical degree at Boston University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts and a Master of Public Health from Boston University School of Public Health.  She has a special interest and expertise in immigrant and refugee health, infectious diseases, and tropical and travel medicine.

Dr. Sweet is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, Infectious Diseases Society of America, International Society for Infectious Diseases, and the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

CCS Pediatrics is affiliated with St. Mary’s Health System and is located at 100 Campus Avenue in Lewiston. For more information about Dr. Sweet or CCS Pediatrics, please visit or call (207) 755-3160.

The Strollin’ Colon

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

Strollin colon 2014 016In an effort to raise awareness about cancer during Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders brings you “The Strollin’ Colon.” Take a stroll through the “The Strollin’ Colon” on Wednesday, March 25 from 9AM to 11AM at the entrance to the Main Lobby of St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center at 95 Campus Avenue in Lewiston.  Inside the Main Lobby, we’ll have experts available to answer your questions about preventing colorectal cancer.

Colorectal cancer remains the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Despite these staggering statistics, colorectal cancer is one of the most preventable, treatable, and beatable forms of cancer, especially when it is caught early.

Know the Signs of a Stroke

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

shuli bonham hs 9-2014 croppedShuli Bonham at CCS Family Health Care wants you to know the signs of a stroke.

Signs that you may be having a stroke:

Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body

Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding

Sudden trouble seeing or blurred vision in one or both eyes

Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination

Sudden severe headache with no known cause

You should never wait more than five minutes to dial 9-1-1 if you experience even one of the signs above. Remember, you could be having a stroke even if you’re not experiencing all of the symptoms. And remember to check the time. The responding emergency medical technician or ER nurse at the hospital will need to know when the first symptom occurred.

Learn more about the effect of heart disease on women by visiting the American Heart Association. Talk to your doctor. If you need a provider call 777-8899. Make an appointment with a Cardiologist (in Lewiston call 777-5300). Learn the warning signs.


National Wear Red Day

Friday, February 6th, 2015

St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center, in partnership with the American Heart Association, is encouraging everyone to Wear Red today, February 6, 2015 to raise awareness of the number 1 killer of women, heart disease.

In Maine, more than 1 of every 4 deaths is from heart disease or stroke.  Don’t become a statistic. Take charge of your health!  One key to heart health is to know some very important numbers: your blood pressure, cholesterol, and BMI.   Ideally, here’s where they should be (for non-diabetics):

  • Total cholesterol of 200 mg/dL or lower
  • HDL (“good” cholesterol) of 50 mg/dL or higher for women and 40 mg/dL or higher for men
  • LDL (“bad” cholesterol) of 100 or lower
  • Triglycerides of less than 150 mg/dL.
  • Your BMI, or Body Mass Index, is based on your height and weight. If it is greater than 25 you are at higher risk of heart disease and stroke.  There are many BMI calculators available online such as
Roy Ulin

Roy Ulin, MD MaineHealth Cardiology

“Most of the time, you will not feel the symptoms of high blood pressure or high cholesterol,” said Dr. Roy Ulin a cardiologist at Maine Medical Partners MaineHealth Cardiology and partner of St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center. “The only way to know for sure if you’re at risk is to know your numbers and take action to fix it.”  Ask your primary care provider how your numbers compare.

Dr. Ulin said one of the best things you can do for your heart is to exercise.  “You don’t have to run a 10K or take a Zumba class, but you do need to move and increase your heart rate.  Ten minutes of brisk walking three times a day can go a long way towards improving your heart health.”

For all the good things you do to keep heart healthy it is important to also avoid the habits that can hurt your health. “Smoking damages your heart and blood vessels, making you two to four times more likely to have heart disease, a heart attack, and/or stroke.” said Dr. Ulin.  “Women who are on birth control pills are at even greater risk. But, if you quit, within three to five years, your risk of heart disease decreases to the level of a non-smoker regardless of how long you’ve been smoking.”

You do what you can to protect your loved ones and to keep them healthy. This year, do something for YOU. Changes you make now can have a positive effect for a lifetime.

Caring for the Caregiver: A free presentation at St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

One of the most important and frequently overlooked things a caregiver can do for their loved ones is to take good care of themselves. Often, caregivers are so focused on making sure everyone’s needs are met, that they don’t take the time to look after themselves.

If you’re a caregiver, please join us for an important free presentation on Thursday, November 20, 2014 at 5:30pm. During this presentation, Yasmine King,
FNP-C, and Jennifer Hazen, BSN, RN, OCN, from St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders will discuss:

• the physical and emotional toll of caregiving
• ways to reduce stress
• how to improve your overall health
• where to find support resources

The presentation will be held at the Lepage Large Conference Room at 99 Campus Avenue in Lewiston. Snacks will be provided. Seating for this program is limited. To reserve your seat, please call 777-8458 by November 18, 2014.

Nutrition in Cancer Prevention and Cancer Care

Monday, September 8th, 2014

If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, one of the best things you can do to support a positive outcome is eating healthy. Nutrient-rich foods provide the resources your body needs to function at its best. Some of the benefits of good nutrition for people with cancer are:

• Decreasing the risk of infection
• Improving strength and increasing energy
• Maintaining body mass and increasing new tissue growth
• Speeding the recovery process

Join experts from St. Mary’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders for a free presentation about cancer and nutrition. We’ll discuss nutrition to prevent cancer, foods that contain “cancer killing” antiangiogenic properties, and choosing the right oil. The presentation will take place on Wednesday, September 24, 2014 at 5:30 pm at St. Mary’s Nutrition Center, 208 Bates Street, Lewiston.

Dr. Yelena Patsiornik, a hematologist/oncologist with the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, will discuss the science behind well-balanced diets for cancer patients and the important role it plays in your care and in preventing the disease. Our oncology certified nurses, Linda Merchant, Stephanie Buswell will prepare easy and nutrient-dense recipes, and clinical dietician Karen Emmi will answer your questions about nutrition.

Seating is limited so call today to make your reservation 777-8593.

Back-to-School Sleep Routine by Jennifer Radel

Friday, August 15th, 2014

The lazy days of summer are coming to a close. School will be starting soon and it will be “early to bed, early to rise” once again. I think I can speak for most parents when I say that getting the kids back into the school year routine is challenging at best making mornings in particular, miserable. This year I vowed to make it easier for all of us. I’m fortunate enough that I work in healthcare and have access to the experts. I solicited some advice from sleep and behavioral medicine specialist, Thaddeus Shattuck, MD from St. Mary’s Center for Sleep Disorders.

First of all, how much sleep do children need? “While every child is different,” says Dr. Shattuck, “generally speaking, children between the ages of 5 and 12 should get somewhere around 10 to 11 hours of sleep, ages 12 to18, about 8.5 to 9.5 hours sleep.”

If your kids are used staying up until 9:00pm in the summer, don’t expect them to suddenly fall asleep at 8pm. A simple hour change can translate into sleepless nights. We all know a child who is not well rested will have difficulty learning and adjusting to a new teacher and classroom routine.

Dr. Shattuck suggests gradually setting back bed time. Put your kids to bed 15 minutes earlier each night and wake them up 15 minutes earlier each morning. Ideally you’d like them adjusted to their schedule a week before the start of school.

Practicing good sleep hygiene is also helpful. Start winding down after dinner. Taking a bath, reading a book, and listening to soothing music will help make the transition from busy day to restful night easier. Then, make sure your child’s room is cool, quiet and dark or dimly lit at bedtime.

“Turn off all your electronics an hour before bedtime,” says Dr. Shattuck. “Light from a tablet, laptop, or smart phone is at the blue end of the color spectrum. This color is common in daylight, but not at night. Using these devices before bed can disrupt your circadian rhythm, your body’s internal clock. Don’t leave these devices charging next to your bed either. Even small amounts of that light can trick your brain into thinking it’s morning and wake you from a peaceful sleep.”

In a nutshell, the key to a good night’s sleep is having a bedtime routine and keeping it year round. “Whether it is summer, Christmas vacation, or the weekend, maintaining the nighttime
ritual is best for your child,” says Dr. Shattuck. “You can still have the occasional late night to watch the fireworks or tell ghost stories by the campfire, but try to get back on track after that.”
Something to keep in mind for next summer!

Now, off to complete my back-to-school shopping list.


Dr. Thaddeus Shattuck is the Medical Director at the Center for Sleep Disorders at St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center. He earned his master’s degree in Public Health from The Dartmouth Institute and his medical degree from Dartmouth Medical School in Hanover, New Hampshire. He completed his fellowship in Sleep Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts.

Dr. Shattuck is the president of the Maine Sleep Society and a member of the American Psychiatric Association and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. He is board certified in Sleep Medicine and Psychiatry.

Jennifer Radel has been the Community Relations Manager at St. Mary’s Health System in Lewiston, Maine for eight years.  On a daily basis she gets to work with some of the best health care providers in the State of Maine, and routinely picks their brains for the best ways to keep her family and friends healthy. Jennifer is a mom of two boys and wife who volunteers with several community groups. She is on the Board of Directors for Literacy Volunteers-Androscoggin. Prior to coming to St. Mary’s, Jennifer spent nearly 15 years working in television, mainly as a news producer in upstate New York and Portland, Maine. During that time she received the Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence among other awards for journalism.


Hospitalists at St. Mary’s Recognized for Quality of Care

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014
Dr Pena and Karen Richardson-1sm

Left to right: Karen Richardson, Hospitalist RN and Chief Hospitalist Dr. Amber Pena

Congratulations to the team of Sound Physicians hospitalists at St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center. These specialists have been recognized for providing exceptional clinical care and patient experience to hospitalized patients. At their recent annual meeting, Sound Physicians presented St. Mary’s hospitalists awards for the Highest Performing Hospital in the Atlantic Region and the Most Improved Hospitalist Team in the Atlantic Region. These awards were based upon performance on a number of quality/safety outcome measures from core measures performance, length of stay and patient experience scores. Accepting the awards were Chief Hospitalist Dr. Amber Peña and Karen Richardson, Hospitalist RN.

Sound Physicians is a leading hospitalist organization that provides care to patients while they are in the hospital at St. Mary’s and for more than 100 hospitals nationwide. The hospitalists at St Mary’s are committed to improve the quality and reduce the cost of care in our community. They work closely with a patient’s primary care provider to establish a seamless transition in care from hospital to home.

National Cancer Survivors Day® Observed Sunday, June 1

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

Noreen LaBatt National Cancer Survivors Day® (NCSD) is Sunday, June 1, 2014. This 27th annual celebration of life will be held in hundreds of communities worldwide. Cancer survivors, caregivers, family members, friends, and healthcare professionals will unite to show that life after a cancer diagnosis can be meaningful, productive, and even inspiring.

The Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Hope & Healing in collaboration with Central Maine Medical Center, St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center and the Lakes Region Oncology Nursing Society is hosting the Hollywood-themed event, featuring keynote speaker Noreen Labatt, a full-time Mom who turned her cancer experience into a life-affirming comedy act. There will be activities for cancer survivors and caregivers of all ages including reiki, self-massage, mindfulness meditation, healthy cooking demonstrations, opportunities for photographs, frame-making, music and more. Light refreshments will be served. The event takes place on Sunday, June 1st, 2014, at The Dempsey Center, 29, Lowell St., Lewiston, Maine from noon – 3pm. Reservations are requested – contact The Dempsey Center at 795-8250. This local event is part of a worldwide celebration coordinated by the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation and supported nationally by Coping® with Cancer magazine.

“Come walk the red carpet at the Hollywood inspired event and learn how surviving cancer is more than just living. It’s an attitude about life and living each day to the fullest,” says Maureen Higgins, Cancer Health Outreach Educator for The Dempsey Center. “You will find our community’s NCSD event filled with joy, camaraderie, hope, compassion, faith, and love as we honor cancer survivors for their strength and courage. Come listen to inspiring speakers, connect with others, enjoy some music and participate in a variety of wellness activities.”

Anyone living with a history of cancer – from the moment of diagnosis through the remainder of life, is a cancer survivor, according to the NCSD Foundation. Nearly 14 million Americans are now living with and beyond a diagnosis of cancer. In the United States, men have a slightly less than 1 in 2 lifetime risk of developing cancer; for women, the risk is a little more than 1 in 3. Learning about this disease is crucial, because many forms of cancer can be prevented and most cured if detected early.

Major advances in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment have resulted in longer survival, and therefore, a growing number of cancer survivors. However, a cancer diagnosis can leave a host of problems in its wake. Physical, financial, and emotional hardships often persist after diagnosis and treatment. Survivors may face many challenges, such as limited access to cancer specialists and promising new treatments, inadequate or no insurance, financial hardships, difficulty finding employment, psychosocial struggles, and a lack of understanding from family and friends. In light of these difficulties, our community needs to focus on improving the quality of life for cancer survivors.

“Despite these challenges, cancer survivors live full, productive lives and serve as an inspiration to all of us. Whether in Hollywood or in Maine, they are the true stars.” says Jen Hazen, Oncology Nurse Navigator, St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center.

This year’s local National Cancer Survivors Day celebration of life will be held in our community at
WHERE: The Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Hope & Healing, 29 Lowell St., Lewiston, Maine
WHEN: June 1, 2014, noon – 3pm.
RSVP: 795-8250
Visit for more information about National Cancer Survivors Day.