Archive for August, 2010

St. Mary’s Main Laboratory Receives Accreditation

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010

Left to Right: 1st row: Linda Chase, Linda Edwards, Alfred Aloegnikou, Deb. Leeman, Donna Brown; 2nd row: Gina Dick, Tammy Burgess, Colleen Holigan, Jen Nadeau, Tanya Mailhot, Donna Kassa, Joan Tardif; 3rd row: Glen Bolduc, Karen Hobson, Megan Chase, Lisa Thibault, Marjie Lachance, Julia Bundy; 4th row: Linda Snow, Amy Brown, Anne Leveque, Doreen Rancourt, Jeannie Poor

St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center

Main Laboratory in Lewiston has earned accreditation by the Accreditation Committee of the College of American Pathologists (CAP), based on the results of a recent onsite inspection.

The laboratory’s director, David J. Gallick, MD, was advised of its national recognition and congratulated for the excellence of the services being provided. St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center Main Laboratory is one of 7,000 CAP-accredited laboratories worldwide.

The CAP Laboratory Accreditation Program, begun in the early 1960s, is recognized by the federal government as being equal to or more stringent than the government’s own inspection program.

During the CAP accreditation process, inspectors examine the laboratory’s records and quality control of procedures for the preceding 2 years.  CAP inspectors also examine laboratory staff qualifications, as well as the laboratory’s equipment, facilities, safety program and record, in addition to the overall management of the laboratory.  This stringent inspection program is designed to ensure the highest standard of care for all laboratory patients.

The College of American Pathologists is a medical society that serves more then 17,000 physician members and the laboratory community throughout the world. It is the world’s largest association composed exclusively of board-certified pathologists and is widely considered the leader in laboratory quality assurance.  CAP is an advocate for high-quality and cost-effective patient care.  More information about CAP can be found at www.cap.org.

St. Mary’s Farmers & Artisans Market – September 1, 2010

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010

Celeste & Amanda working the Valley View Farm stand. Valley View is a traditional farm located in Auburn, offering seasonal produce, eggs, meat & Sunset Acres cheese.

Wednesday, September 1, 2010
11:30 am – 3:00 pm (rain or shine) -
Parking Lot – Corner of Lafayette Street & Campus Avenue, Lewiston
  

This Week’s Vendors  

Comb Honey 
Comb honey is raw honey, still in the honeycomb. It is in quart boxes and weighs a little less than a pound. You can spread it on warm toast and eat the comb and honey or you can mash it and strain the honey  through cheesecloth. It can be kept at room temperature.  

Hummingbird Farm (visit them at www.hummingbirdfarm.net)
Located in Turner, Hummingbird Farm is a specialty nursery who sells clematis, fancy leaved geraniums, and herb plants & fresh cut herbs. They also make handcrafted herbal soaps, lotions & body care products.  

Valley View Farm
A traditional farm located in Auburn (visit them at www.valleyviewfarmme.com)
Offering seasonal produce, eggs, meat and Sunset Acres cheese.  

Phoenix Farm 
An Organic farm located in Monmouth offering seasonal vegetables, jams & fruit spreads and baked goods including fruit muffins, bread and sweet breads or pastries.  

Fresh Start Farms 
The New American Sustainable Agriculture Project is a community-based agricultural initiative  that supports new Americans as they establish agricultural businesses. Offering seasonal vegetables, fruit & herbs.  

Clay Hill Farm 
Located in Peru, Maine. Offering all natural angus steer beef, whole chicken, produce & farm fresh eggs.  

What’s Up Farm 
Located in New Gloucester. Offering home-grown seasonal vegetables.  

“Head Huggers” 
Hand crocheted hats in a rainbow of colors, made by Lily Gagnon. Proceeds from sales are used to make additional hats that are donated to cancer patients & programs.  

ArtVan 
A mobile arts therapy program of VSA Maine brings original works of art; pottery and cards made by youth artists, sharing their gratitude by helping to raise funds for the program through sales of their fabulous art work! Come support youth and the arts & learn about the program.  

EBT machine available - credit & debits cards, in addition to food stamps SNAP/WIC transactions are welcome 
For a limited time all food stamp, SNAP & WIC customers will receive vouchers matching purchases (up to $10.00) that are redeemable for free produce.

Going back to school means a shift in schedules

Friday, August 27th, 2010

By:  Dr. Shattuck, St. Mary’s Center for Sleep Disorders 

Driving to work today, I noticed the first hints of fall in a smattering of yellow and red leaves. A yellow school bus then pulled out in front of me reminding me that the change in season also means that kids will be returning to school soon—if not already.

Going back to school means a shift in schedules that inevitably affects children’s sleep patterns. Leisurely summer mornings of sleeping in are replaced by a mad dash to make it to the bus stop in time. Most children are able to shift their schedules after a brief period of adjustment. However, for some the change in schedule can be problematic and lead to personal, family, or academic problems.

A few strategies can help to ease the adjustment to an earlier wake-up time:

1) Anticipate—try to gradually move your child’s bedtime earlier in the weeks preceding the start of school. A good rule of thumb is waking your child 15-30 minutes earlier per week.

2) Have a consistent wake-up time on weekdays and weekends. If your child tends to sleep late, allowing ‘catch-up’ sleep on weekends will only reinforce this tendency and make it more difficult to reset his or her body clock to an earlier time on school days.

3) Have a predictable bedtime routine that is quiet and soothing.

4) Prohibit computer use before bed. Computer monitors emit blue light which suppresses melatonin and may delay the body’s sleep time.

5) Electronic devices in children and teenagers’ bedrooms can also be a source of distraction. Consider putting a lock on your teen’s Blackberry if he or she just can’t stop texting or gaming at bedtime.

6) Encourage your child to get bright light in the morning, ideally within 30 minutes of waking. This can have a powerful effect on shifting one’s internal clock to an earlier bedtime.

With consistent attention to these behaviors, many children and teens will settle into the groove of school without problems. However, should sleep problems persist, discuss them with your pediatrician and consider an evaluation by a sleep specialist.

Dr. Shattuck earned his medical degree from Dartmouth Medical School in Hanover, New Hampshire. He completed his Psychiatric Residency at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island and a Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Sleep Medicine Fellowship in Boston, Massachusetts.

Dr. Shattuck practices at St. Mary’s Center for Sleep Disorders at St. Mary’s Medical Building at 15 Gracelawn Road in Auburn. For more information, please call (207) 777-8959 or visit www.stmarysmaine.com.

Multi-grain versus whole grain?

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

By:  Jennifer Smith, MS, NASM-CPT, NASE-CSS, AFAA-PGEI
Prevention and Wellness

With all the hype out there it can be confusing to determine which choices are the most nutritious –especially when it comes to carbohydrates. For instance, a bread or pasta could be labeled 100% wheat leading consumers to believe it’s a healthier choice when in actuality, the bread might be a refined grain with a little molasses or another ingredient added to make it appear darker brown in color like many whole grains are. (Remember a whole grain contains all three parts of the grain –the bran, germ, and starchy endosperm. Where as, a refined grain has the nutrient rich bran and germ stripped.)

Likewise, another product may perhaps be labeled multi-grain leading consumers to believe this too is a healthier choice. The reality is multi-grain simply means the product contains multiple grains. The grains could be refined, whole, or a mixture of the two. According to the ADA, foods labeled with the words multi-grain, stone-ground, 100% wheat, cracked wheat, or 7-grain are usually not whole-grain products.

The key is to look for the word “whole” in the ingredient list. I find it easier to ignore all the healthy sounding marketing jargon and just flip the product over to see if the first few ingredients actually say “whole”. Using the Nutrition Facts panel to compare which product has the higher percent daily value of fiber is another good indicator of the amount of whole grain the product contains.

Pasta with Grape Tomatoes

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

By:  Jennifer Smith,  MS, NASM-CPT, NASE-CSS, AFAA-PGEI
Prevention and Wellness

This time of year my garden is in full swing, so I’m always looking for delicious recipes to utilize my fresh produce and add a bit of variety to my meals. With a new baby boy and a new puppy, I’m also looking for quick, easy, tasty, and healthy recipes. This pasta with grape tomatoes meal certainly fits the bill, as I can get it cooked and on the table in less than 15-minutes. Plus, I keep the whole wheat pasta on hand in my pantry and generally the parmesan cheese as well so there’s no need to take a trip to the grocery store either.

While this recipe contains a number of good, wholesome ingredients, like the fiber rich whole grain pasta and the dark leafy green spinach chock-full of vitamins, it does contain parmesan cheese. Despite popular belief, it’s not the carbohydrates (aka pasta in this case) that are fattening but rather consuming excess calories that will result in weight gain, although, that’s a topic for another day. Nonetheless, if you’re watching your weight and looking to cut calories, you may choose to cut back or eliminate the cheese –especially when considering that shredded parmesan cheese is high in sodium and saturated fat. Contrary, it is a good source of phosphorus, protein, and calcium. Not to mention, it’s super tasty in my opinion. Plus, in this recipe by combining the whole-wheat pasta with the cheese, we’re obtaining all the essential amino acids to make a complete protein.

That said, when it comes to food and actually most everything else in life, I strive for balance. When you look at your meals, do they contain a fruit or vegetable, starch, and a protein? All food groups provide different vitamins, minerals, and nutrients, which is why variety is so important. Similarly, each macronutrient affects the digestive system differently. For instance, carbohydrate digestion begins in the mouth and stomach, so it tends to move into your blood stream faster. While, the digestion of fat is completed in the lower part of the small intestine and is therefore the slowest. The key is to combine foods with the goal of delaying stomach emptying which will make you feel fuller longer. For example, you might add a dab of peanut butter to a crisp apple for a great fall snack.

My rule of thumb is to make every effort to use nutrient-dense ingredients with the idea of moderation –not deprivation. Did your last meal contain a fruit or vegetable, starch, and a protein? If not, how could you alter it?

Jennifer Smith holds a bachelor’s degree in Sports Medicine with a concentration in nutrition and a minor in education, a master’s degree in exercise science and health promotion and is a nationally certified personal trainer, group exercise instructor, and speed coach.

Pasta with Grape Tomatoes

1 clove garlic (about 1 tsp minced)
1 tbsp olive oil
1 pint grape tomatoes halved
6-7 basil leaves cut into strips
20-30 baby spinach leaves cut into strips
½ c shredded parmesan cheese
1 box whole-wheat spaghetti 

Directions:

  • Cook pasta
  • While pasta is cooking, sauté garlic in olive oil over low heat in large skillet, halve tomatoes, and cut basil and spinach into strips. 
  • Add tomatoes, basil, and spinach strips to skillet for 2-minutes
  • Save ½ c. pasta water
  • Toss spaghetti and reserved pasta water in skillet
  • Sprinkle with parmesan cheese
  • Season with salt and pepper to taste

Construction Update

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

Things are really starting to take shape on the construction site of the new OR/Lab/Pharmacy. One quarter of the ground floor will be ready for its first coat of paint next week! After that, crews will be able to install the ceiling, flooring, counters, and cabinets!

We’re still awaiting word on when crews will do final work on Campus Avenue. The last significant step is paving. This will disrupt traffic. We will update you as soon as we get information.

St. Mary’s Farmers & Artisans Market Today!

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

 

Janelle Demers & Emily DeTroy at the ArtVan table, a mobile arts therapy program that brings original works of art; pottery and cards made by youth artists, sharing their gratitude by helping to raise funds for the program through sales of their fabulous art work! Come support youth and the arts & learn about the program

Wednesday, August 25th
11:30 am – 3:00 pm (rain or shine)
Parking Lot – Corner of Lafayette Street & Campus Avenue

We hold the Market Rain or Shine, and it looks like today will be a wet one! Don’t let the weather keep you from picking up fresh produce and other items this week. Due to unforseen circumstances, previously adverstised chair massages will not be available this week.

Special this Week:

• We will have some “first-of-the-season” apples & pears from Willow Pond Farm in Sabattus available for sale at the information table.

• Come and meet bee keeper Peggy Volock, Peggy will be selling Comb Honey (comb honey is raw honey, still in the honeycomb.)

This Weeks Vendors

Comb Honey
Comb honey is raw honey, still in the honeycomb. It is in quart boxes and weighs a little less than a pound. You can spread it on warm toast and eat the comb and honey or you can mash it and strain the honey through cheesecloth. It can be kept at room temperature.

Valley View Farm
A traditional farm located in Auburn (visit them at www.valleyviewfarmme.com)
Offering seasonal produce, eggs, meat and Sunset Acres cheese.

Phoenix Farm
An Organic farm located in Monmouth offering seasonal vegetables, jams & fruit spreads and baked goods including fruit muffins, bread and sweet breads or pastries.

Fresh Start Farms
The New American Sustainable Agriculture Project is a community-based agricultural initiative that supports new Americans as they establish agricultural businesses. Offering seasonal vegetables, fruit & herbs.

Clay Hill Farm
Located in Peru, Maine. Offering all natural angus steer beef, whole chicken, produce & farm fresh eggs.

What’s Up Farm
Located in New Gloucester. Offering home-grown seasonal vegetables.

“Head Huggers”
Hand crocheted hats in a rainbow of colors, made by Lily Gagnon. Proceeds from sales are used to make additional hats that are donated to cancer patients & programs.

ArtVan
A mobile arts therapy program of VSA Maine brings original works of art; pottery and cards made by youth artists, sharing their gratitude by helping to raise funds for the program through sales of their fabulous art work! Come support youth and the arts & learn about the program.

EBT machine available
- credit & debits cards, in addition to food stamps SNAP/WIC transactions are welcome
For a limited time all food stamp, SNAP & WIC customers will receive vouchers matching purchases (up to $10.00) that are redeemable for free produce.
See the information table at the market for details.

Swim for Fitness

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

Join HealthSteps for a refreshing water workout in the 8-lane pool for lap swimming or aquatic fitness.

HealthSteps, part of the Prevention and Wellness Services offered through St. Mary’s Health System, offers a wide variety of classes for adults. Among them are our Aquatic Fitness and Lap Swim, available with a core membership.

Aquatic Fitness
Join us for a super toning, calorie-burning, fun workout! While swimming skills are not needed, a comfort level in both deep and shallow water is important.

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 6:30 am – 7:15 am
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11:00 am – 11:45 am

Lap Swim
Swim at your own pace and enjoy this individualized form of exercise in the 25-meter, 8-lane pool supervised by a certified lifeguard.

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 6:05 am – 7:30 am
Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:05 am – 7:00 am and 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Swim classes are held in the beautiful Bates College Merrill Gymnasium. Classes begin September 7 and run through December 17. The cost of a core membership, which includes a variety of classes, is $112.00.

All instructors are certified and ready to take you through a safe and productive workout no matter what your fitness level. For more information or to register, call HealthSteps at 777-8898 or visit them on the web.

Join the Club

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

St. Mary’s d’Youville Pavilion Therapeutic Activities Department will be starting a 4-H club in September. 4-H is a learning-by-doing program for kids. The four “H”s target life skills,

Head: Planning, organizing, problem solving
Heart: Communication, showing concern for others
Hands: Community service and volunteering
Healthy Life Styles: Stress management, character education

We are looking for kids, 8 to 16 years of age, who are interested in working with elders on various fun activities such as crafts and gardening. Younger children are also welcome to join, with parents attending. Our meetings will be held every second and fourth Tuesday of the month from 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm, and there is no cost! We encourage you to sign up quickly as we have a limited amount of spaces available!

Find out what learning-by-doing is all about and join the club!

For more information and to sign up, contact Tami Girardin, Manager of Therapeutic Activities at 777-4252 or e-mail.

Variety and spontaneity were alive at d’Youville Pavilion

Monday, August 23rd, 2010

One of the principals defined in the Eden Alternative identifies the three plagues of Elders living in a long term care facility; loneliness, helplessness and boredom. Boredom is the pain we feel when our lives lack variety and spontaneity. 

Variety and spontaneity were alive at d’Youville Pavilion this week as the Elders spent the afternoon organizing and participating in a wheelchair parade throughout the whole building.

 The idea came up when the activities team and the Elders sat down to plan their activities for the month. Since the big event of the month is the country fair they were talking about things associated with a country fair and the idea of a parade came up.  The activities team and the Elders put their heads together and decided to decorate their wheelchairs. They covered the chairs with crepe paper, garland and flowers; some of them even decorated themselves, wearing crazy hats and beads.

 With no real plan in place except to move throughout the facility they headed off. They paraded through the Rehab Center, up to the Third and Fourth floor neighborhoods and into Administration. We ended up having several different parades because they were all over the building, some of them taking different routes. Others joined us as the parade passed by them because they saw how much fun everyone was having. It was exciting to see everyone participating, from Volunteers, Administration staff, student CNA’s and Pastoral Care!  

Most of the Elders had never been in a parade before and they thoroughly enjoyed themselves and took pleasure in the smiling faces of the spectators. They were all exhausted at the end but very happy.